Posts Tagged ‘succubus’


This novel spans several centuries, following the relationship of the two most iconic monsters in literary history. Once as close as brothers but now sworn enemies, Bram Stoker’s Dracula and Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein meet for a final showdown beneath the streets of New York City.
Night Things (Dracula versus Frankenstein) takes place in a world just like yours with one startling difference: every creature of legend has stepped forward from the shadow and they now exist shoulder to shoulder with humankind! New York City has become a macabre melting pot. Vampires, werewolves, zombies and ghouls are now the new immigrants and they are chasing the American dream. The Night Things have become part of the system. But many humans feel the creatures are dangerous ticking time bombs.
Dracula, considered the messiah of the Night Things, builds an unstoppable army as he plots to wipe humanity from the face of the earth. The mysterious New York crime boss, Johnny Stücke (the creation of Frankenstein) wants to keep the peace between the Night Things and humanity. Stücke fears total extermination of his kind, should Dracula unleash his forces on New York.
The fight for the night begins.
Critically-acclaimed horror author Terry M. West continues his Magic Now series with this standalone novel that presents a world only a slight shade darker than our own.

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Think “True Blood” in an urban setting, add a dash of “The Sopranos” and blend in a big-budget action blockbuster finale, and you have something approximating Night Things. The subtitle – Dracula vs. Frankenstein – alludes to the novel’s B-grade horror inspirations. The monsters don’t stray far from the commonly accepted rules; vampires still drink blood and are killed by sunlight, zombies still eat human flesh (although there is an interesting new “rule” added for the zombies that allows them to function for the most part in human society, and I’m not too sure about the Mummy…). The writing is fast-paced and uncomplicated, with the occasional acute observation to lift it above common B-grade horror fare. My favourites include:

“And the world has a way of making those who are different believe they are monsters.”

“I have no respect for someone who doesn’t recognize the value of a scar.”

The monsters have a certain degree of nuance to their characterization; Johnny Stücke is a beautifully drawn anti-hero (Mary Shelley would probably approve of how he’s turned out in the 21st century), and human Gary Hack is this messed-up weakling of a man that you still somehow can’t help sympathising with. Even the “bad guys” have convincing backstories that explain how they turned to the dark side.

Readers who enjoy this novel will be pleased to know that the second Night Things book, Undead and Kicking, is due out in a week and the e-book can be pre-ordered on Amazon for under a dollar.

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About the author:
Terry M. West is an American horror author. His best known works: What Price Gory, Car Nex, Dreg and his Night Things series. He is also the managing editor of the Halloween/horror website, Halloween Forevermore. He was a finalist for 2 International Horror Guild Awards and he was featured on the TV Guide Sci-Fi hot list for his YA graphic novel series, Confessions of a Teenage Vampire. Terry was born in Texas, lived in New York for two decades and he currently hangs his hat in California. www.terrymwest.com

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Since we’ve been talking about the stories in The Demonologia Biblica lately, I suppose I ought to tell you about mine.

Editor Dean Drinkel assigned me the letter “E”. Out of all my choices, I decided on Eisheth; for what exact reason, I can’t recall, but I suspect it had something to do with the fact that she is a female demon. My brief Google searches described Eisheth variously as a succubus, an angel of sacred prostitution, a queen of the demons and one of the four wives of the angel/demon Samael. I did a Stephenie Meyer and deliberately did not investigate the legends of Eisheth in any great detail so as to bring my own interpretation to her story (so if I start getting death threats from disgruntled kabbalists and demonologists, I’ll know why).

In Late for Eisheth, the hapless narrator meets up with the eponymous demon queen after hearing about her extraordinary charms from one of his patients. He is oblivious to what he is actually getting himself in for, and much wickedness ensues.

Copyright restrictions prevent me from posting an artist’s interpretation of what Eisheth might look like, so instead I’ll post a link to what appears to be the most popular rendering of her according to Google Images. http://genzoman.deviantart.com/art/Eisheth-Zenunim-143389214

Look like she could rip out your heart and make you thank her for the pain? Good. That’s what I was going for.