Review: Nick and Abe by Lex H Jones

Posted: March 29, 2016 in Reviews - TV, movie, book and whatever
Tags: , , , , , ,

Every once in a while, God and Lucifer visit the earth and make a wager. Now it’s time for the next one; the most daring yet, and quite possibly the last.

“This venture to live as men for a full year had been such a hilarious idea to start with. Prove Abe wrong… again… then head back to their respective domains and gloat about it forever. Only it hadn’t worked out that way. Things were different now. Having omniscient sight removed from him actually made Nick see things more clearly than he ever had. There’s harm in getting too close to a picture, but a different sort of harm comes from getting too far away from it.”

What starts as a simple contest becomes something more as their newfound humanity forces them to revaluate their relationship not only with the world, but with each other as father and son. Seen through the eyes of two men, on opposing sides of a family feud of epic proportions, each of them faces trials, heartache, love and real pain as they learn what it means to be human. Can old wounds ever really be closed? Can the past truly be forgiven? And can anyone ever fall so far that it’s too late for them to be caught? “After the fall? You rise.”

* * * * *

Nick and Abe explores the question that Joan Osborne asks –  “What if God Was One of Us?” Author Lex Jones takes two eternal archetypes, God and the Devil, and renders them small and human, giving them all-too-relatable problems as they navigate their way through the earthly realm without the assistance of divine powers and omniscience (well, Nick does cheat a little towards the end, but he wouldn’t be the Devil if he wasn’t open to bending the rules from time to time…). At first glance, Abe’s casting as a humble janitor and Nick as a ruthlessly successful ad executive seems clichéd. And it is, deliberately so; all the better to smash apart the clichés to get to the real people beneath.

Jones has some interesting takes on what we commonly hold to be true about the Christian faith. Nick isn’t really evil – but he is opinionated, materialistic and hedonistic, and driven by his long-standing feud with his father. And Abe seems hopelessly naïve for a man who is the fleshly representation of an all-powerful deity – until you understand that God’s entire modus operandi has been to observe from a distance, thus his understanding of humanity is incomplete.

Don’t expect thunderbolts, moving mountains and lofty proclamations – the story is character-driven and heavy on the dialogue, the quality of which is the novel’s greatest strength.

Nick and Abe on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Nick-Abe-Lex-H-Jones-ebook/dp/B01AXCM53O/

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